Ayurveda Medicine

Register
Forgot your your password?
Thank you for joining SoulBEing!
Start Your Journey

Are you a Wellness Professional? Consider joining our network.

Join as a Professional

Ayurveda is one of the world’s oldest medical systems. It originated in India more than 3,000 years agoand remains one of the country’s traditional health care systems. It’s concepts about health and disease promote the use of herbal compounds, special diets, and other unique health practices. India’s government and other institutes throughout the world support clinical and laboratory research on Ayurveda medicine, within the context of the Eastern belief system. Ayurveda medicine is not widely studied as part of conventional (Western) medicine.

The term “Ayurveda” combines the Sanskrit words ayur (life) and veda (science or knowledge). Ayurveda medicine, as practiced in India, is one of the oldest systems of medicine in the world. Many Ayurveda practices predate written records and were handed down by word of mouth. Three ancient books known as the Great Trilogy were written in Sanskrit more than 2,000 years ago and are considered the main texts on Ayurveda medicine—Caraka Samhita, Sushruta Samhita, and Astanga Hridaya.

Key concepts of Ayurveda medicine include universal interconnectedness (among people, their health, and the universe), the body’s constitution (prakriti), and life forces (dosha), which are often compared to the biologic humors of the ancient Greek system. According to Greek tradition, there are four basic substances: earth, water, air, and fire. Each of these has a corresponding ͞humor͟ or biological liquid in the body: black bile, phlegm, blood, and yellow bile, in that order. Ayurveda has historically divided bodily substances into five classical elements: earth, water, fire, air and ether. There are also twenty gunas (qualities or characteristics) which are considered to be inherent in all substances. These are organized in ten pairs of antonyms: heavy/light, cold/hot, unctuous/dry, dull/sharp, stable/mobile, soft/hard, non-slimy/slimy, smooth/coarse, minute/gross, and viscous/liquid.

Ayurveda also names three elemental substances, the doshas (called Vata, Pitta and Kapha), and states that a balance of the doshas results in health, while imbalance results in disease. One Ayurveda view is that the doshas are balanced when they are equal to each other, while another view is that each human possesses a unique combination of the doshas which define this person’s temperament and characteristics. In either case, it is agreed that each person should modulate their behavior or environment to increase or decrease the doshas and maintain their natural state.

Using these concepts, Ayurveda physicians prescribe individualized treatments, including compounds of herbs or proprietary ingredients, diet, exercise, and lifestyle recommendations. Two of the eight branches of classical Ayurveda deal with surgery, but contemporary Ayurveda tends to stress attaining vitality by building a healthy metabolic system and maintaining good digestion and excretion. Ayurveda also focuses on exercise, yoga, and meditation.

Ayurveda medicine uses a variety of products and practices. Some of these products, (which may contain herbs, minerals, or metals) may be harmful, particularly if used improperly or without the direction of a trained practitioner. For example, some herbs can cause side effects or interact with conventional medicines.

The majority of India’s population uses Ayurveda medicine exclusively or combined with conventional Western medicine, and it is also practiced in varying forms in Southeast Asia.

For More information, visit the National Ayurveda Medical Association at http://www.ayurvedanama.org/

Disclaimer: THE INFORMATION PROVIDED HEREIN SHOULD NOT BE USED DURING ANY MEDICAL EMERGENCY OR FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OR TREATMENT OF ANY MEDICAL CONDITION. CALL 911 FOR ALL MEDICAL EMERGENCIES. A LICENSED MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL SHOULD BE CONSULTED FOR DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF ANY AND ALL MEDICAL CONDITIONS.